20 Week Scan

We sat in the waiting room for over forty minutes awaiting our 20 week scan appointment, with all the other mums and dads at various points into pregnancy. The room was packed full of hot bodies with the heating cranked up to full blast like it seems to be in every hospital. I was melting! Finally my name was called and we were shown into a small dark room. My partner, Emmanuel, sat in the guest chair next to the bed and a screen was pulled around us. One woman sat by the computer ready to take down the measurements that would be read out by the sonographer.  They both introduced themselves and we set to work. You know the drill: the cold jelly, the uncomfortable bed and the pressing down until they find the right spot. Then we could see him, a leg, and a rib. So clear in grey and black on the screen in front of us. I was twisting my head to see it all but I didn’t care about the pain in my neck, I just wanted to see my little baby, who I had felt fluttering away in there for the last few weeks.

“Oh we would like to know the sex as well please” I said to the sonographer.

“Let’s see if we have a healthy baby first. We will look at that late”, was her sharp reply.

I was shocked at her bluntness but didn’t think much of it. Of course this is the anomaly scan. They are literately looking for anything that may indicate an unhealthy baby. Down’s syndrome is the one we probably all know about. Along with the other genetic conditions that can be possible to find early. But what we don’t often realise is that they are checking everything! And down to the measurement of a thigh bone can be an indication of an illness, disease or under development. For example, they check the face not to see how adorable they look but to see if a cleft pallet is present.

So the measurements began: the thigh bone, abdominal circumference, the skull and various others. All looked normal. Then we came to the heart and the sonographer couldn’t get a clear view of our little one’s chambers. I was asked to jump up and down, wiggle my hips and generally make a fool of myself to try and get the baby to move. All of which are massively difficult whilst squeezing you bladder closed as it is of course full. We try again. Still nothing.

“Please empty your bladder” was the short sharp instruction I was given. I trundled off to the toilets and did as she asked. I returned to the room and resumed my position on the thing pretending to be a bed. She started pressing the tool across my belly once more. The baby had not moved. This was a trend we had seen at our first scan and would continue to see right up until the end. Our little person in there – always hid from the scans and later the heart monitors. He did not like any of the intrusion, much to the annoyance of the medical professionals. The sonographer was getting irritated. She could clearly see a heart, because I could. We could all hear it beating away. That amazing moment when you hear their heart beat. But ours was dampened by the huffs and puffs from this woman. She presses harder, moves the end of the instrument more aggressively. She still cannot see what she is looking for. She calls in her colleague. I turn to look at Emmanuel who was holding my hand. He makes a face that I know to mean. ‘I know what you are thinking. I am thinking it too.’

The colleague comes in and takes over for a few minutes. They start chatting over us. Not saying anything to us at all at first. Then the second women speaks.

“Yes I agree with you.” She turns to us and finally acknowledges that we are even there and I am attached to the stomach that she is scanning. “We think we can see a problem with the heart. We have to confirm it with each other; which we have. We will send you to fetal medicine.” She finished and left the room. The original sonographer continues her scan and actually starts to explain what the heck is going on. My heart was racing by this point. What a way to drop that on new first time parents, with no explanation. We were stunned. The woman showed us the screen and pointed to the heart. “This side looks smaller than the other and there is possibly a hole, but we can’t see clearly because the baby is in a bad position.” She bluntly stated then began to move the wand away.

“Wait, have you seen the gender?” I asked.

She says nothing and places the wand back on my belly. “Here’s the spine and the bum and that there is the genitals. He’s a boy.” Just as plainly as if she was telling me the day of the week.

I was reeling with information. I wiped down my stomach, said my thanks to the women and left the room. We were in stunned silence at first. Taking our seats again to wait to have my notes folder given back to me. I felt an excitement and shock that I knew I was carrying a son. I had been thinking I was having a girl from the start so this blew my mind. So much happiness! I was having a boy and now we knew! But this sat within a whirlwind of everything else we had just been told. My mind cleared and the information began to settle. That our baby, who was so tiny in there – had a heart problem. Or a possible one. It felt like nothing and everything all at once. Like being sick and hungry at the same time. I couldn’t think about it enough, it was as though the thought had legs and was running away from me.

For some reason the rude manor & tone of the woman who scanned me, sat in front of anything else. I was SO annoyed with her! How dare she be so rude? I spoke with Emmanuel and we discussed that maybe she couldn’t see what she thought she could because our baby boy was sat in the wrong position. Maybe she was rushed and stressed and this was just a blip of information. But something in my own heart told me otherwise. This was the start of a long journey of happiness and anger mixed together at every turn. The not knowing is the hardest thing at all. Nothing is confirmed.

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