PICU – Drains out

Saturdays in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit felt different from weekdays. The doctors and nurses seemed more relaxed. The place felt quieter. Like going shopping on a Sunday, it’s still busy but not as much as the rest of the week. I liked the more relaxed vibe. I chatted to our nurse for the day and found out a little about her. Every day is a new nurse and it was always nice to get to know them a little bit. They would be with me for their whole 12 hour shift pretty much, which can be an intense time span to be close to each other and not talking. It also helped pass the time. I found out that on the weekends, unless an emergency, no surgery took place. Also, no meetings happened. The weekends were for maintenance, observing and recovery. The real business happened during the week and that’s why it all felt smoother. I was surprised to learn that Zach would be having his drain out and later would probably be coming off his ventilator.

First the doctors’ rounds had to happen. Then the individual doctors would come back to check what would be needed. So it was lunch time before it was confirmed. Doctor Jeff came to remove his drain. Dr Jeff is the Shoreditch of the PICU doctors. A very cool cucumber indeed. He came over to explain to me that they would give Zach ketamine to give him a nice sedation in order to take the drain out from his chest. I made some silly jokes about ketamine and to my surprise was greeted by laughs! Yes, Dr Jeff found me funny. Some of the doctors were all very serious which sometimes made more nervous, like being back at school as a student. I hovered by Zach’s bed as they started the procedure, but I couldn’t hang around and watch. It is a thick tube that was being pulled out and I really didn’t fancy seeing the hole it left behind. So I went and sat in the parents room for a few minutes whilst they finished.

When I came back it was all done. Dr Jeff was sat back at the middle station that was central to all of the beds. I went over and said thank you to him directly. Myself and Emmanuel always found it surprising how few people say thank you to the doctors and nurses. I know it’s their job but I was thankful to him, so why not say it!

I went over to Zach who was now very, very out of it thanks to the ketamine. I joked with the nurse about him hopefully having a nice little high. I really should stop making drug jokes to the nurse and doctors or they were going to start thinking I was going to try and sneak some home with me or something. Zach was high as a kite and I was glad. He deserved to not feel pain right now. They told me that it would be a few hours before he came round enough to take the ventilator out, but five hours later he was still very high. He was twitching and wiggling around every now and again, but he wasn’t aware enough to be able to take his own breaths and so it stayed in for now.

It wasn’t until 6pm that night that the ventilator finally came out. He hated having all the hands on him, but he was happy when it was gone. He loved sucking on his dummy again afterwards. It was nice to see him without the tube in. He was super sleepy afterwards and so I just sat holding his hand again. I didn’t stroke his head too much as it made him wiggle around, which I think must have hurt him. So, I just sat and stayed there. I am sure he knew I was there. It was a big day for him. Emmanuel was gutted that he had missed this. He had been sorting things out at home for us. I messaged him all the updates but it’s not the same as being there. All that mattered was that Zach was ok, but we like to do things together when we can. He was so happy to see him when he arrived later that day. It was really sweet to watch him. “Hello Son,” he sang over our sleepy baby. He warmed my heart.

That evening we headed back to Ronald McDonald House feeling positive. He’d had the surgery. He was through the worst part of the recovery process, right? Well that’s what we thought.

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